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Parental Overmanagement of Teens’ Healthcare can be Harmful

Parental-overmanagement-of-teens-healthcare-can-be-harmfulMost parents want to help and protect their children as much as possible. A new study conducted at the University of Michigan suggests that when it comes to healthcare, however, handling scheduling, forms and questions may impede teenagers from learning to care for themselves.

More than one-third of parents were shown in the poll to ask all the questions at their teen’s visits to the doctor, limiting their ability to learn to care for themselves and potentially preventing them from asking about health issues their parents are not aware of.  Teaching teens to slowly start taking care of their own affairs makes them more self-sufficient, but a 2013 study also found it can help lower risks for anxiety and depression, as well as improve overall satisfaction with their lives as they get older.

Parental Overmanagement of Teens' Healthcare can be Harmful

Parental-overmanagement-of-teens-healthcare-can-be-harmfulMost parents want to help and protect their children as much as possible. A new study conducted at the University of Michigan suggests that when it comes to healthcare, however, handling scheduling, forms and questions may impede teenagers from learning to care for themselves.

More than one-third of parents were shown in the poll to ask all the questions at their teen’s visits to the doctor, limiting their ability to learn to care for themselves and potentially preventing them from asking about health issues their parents are not aware of.  Teaching teens to slowly start taking care of their own affairs makes them more self-sufficient, but a 2013 study also found it can help lower risks for anxiety and depression, as well as improve overall satisfaction with their lives as they get older.

Keeping Teens Safe When Babysitting

babysittingIs your teenager babysitting over the holidays to make extra money?  The American Academy of Pediatrics advises the following to keep your teenager safe while babysitting:

  • You should always know where your teen is babysitting and how to reach them.
  • Parents should also know what time your teenager will be home, and how your teen will get to their babysitting job. Consider developing a code word with your teen in case of emergency.
  • Instruct your teen to never allow anyone who has been drinking alcohol or using drugs to drive them home.
  • Make sure there is always someone to escort your teenager home from a babysitting job at night.
  • Encourage your teen to explain to the parents of the children they are babysitting that your teenager has a mandatory curfew. Tell your teen to encourage the parents to call if they are running late.
  • Encourage your teenager to find out how to use the home’s security system, if it has one.
  • Your teenager should always call the child’s parents if the child won’t stop crying or seems sick, or if your teenager doesn’t feel safe.

Social-Emotional Development for Preschoolers

preschool early learning group play social emotionalThe importance of social and emotional development on a young child’s life cannot be emphasized enough. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, healthy social and emotional development is an integral part of a child’s health and wellbeing.  This development is defined as the ability to form satisfying, trusting relationships with others and includes, play, communication, learning, face challenges, and a full range of emotional behaviors. Key features of this development include how children interact with others and how they self manage their emotions and behaviors. In order to promote advantageous social and emotional childhood growth, studies indicate that introducing healthy positive factors in the classroom and at home are in the best interest of the child and will better serve their progress.

Social-Emotional Developmental Milestones

3 years-old:
• Copies adults and friends
• Shows affection for friends without prompting
• Shows wide range of emotions

4 years-old:
• Enjoys doing new things
• More creative with make believe play
• Cooperates with other children
• Would rather play with other children then his/herself

5 years-old:
• Wants to be like friends
• Likes to sing, dance, and act
• Is sometimes demanding and cooperative
• Can tell the difference between real and make-believe

Reference: Promoting Social-Emotional Development. Zero to Three

Parents' Role in Preventing Texting While Driving

texting drivingDistracted driving has become such a safety threat that in the fall, the U.S. Department of Transportation called a summit to address the issue. One of the results was a DOT promise to work with Congress to:

  • Permanently restrict the use of cell phones and other electronic devices in rail operations
  • Ban text messaging and restrict use of cell phones by truck drivers and interstate bus operators
  • Ban school bus drivers convicted of texting while driving from holding commercial driver’s licenses.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data shows that the age group with the greatest proportion of distracted drivers was the under-20 age group.

Parents can encourage driving safety by making cell phone use practical.  Some tips on safe driving and cell phone use:

  • When you know your teen might be driving, don’t just call to visit.
  • Before starting the content of a call, ask the teen if she is driving. If she is, tell her to pull over and call her back.
  • If you need to talk to your teen, make the call short. Don’t have emotional conversations or make critical decisions over the cell phone.

Tools are available for parents to promote safe driving. The Students Against Destructive Decisions group offers a safe driving contract that parents and their children can sign to encourage safe driving.

Parents are encouraged to perform a “commentary drive,” an exercise with their teen drivers to reinforce the dangers of texting while driving. The parent should drive with the teen in the passenger seat and take an unfamiliar route. The teen should start texting and, at the same time, describe two things:

  • what he or she sees
  • how he or she would respond.

Parents should pay attention to the potential hazards the child is missing—a hidden driveway, children playing near the street, etc.—and point them out to the teen.

Parent groups can encourage driving safety by linking parents with these tips and safe driving tools.  These groups can also advocate for “intolerance” for texting while driving and other distracted driving behaviors exhibited by school bus drivers or other employees on school business.

For more information, visit the National PTA’s website

 

Parents’ Role in Preventing Texting While Driving

texting drivingDistracted driving has become such a safety threat that in the fall, the U.S. Department of Transportation called a summit to address the issue. One of the results was a DOT promise to work with Congress to:

  • Permanently restrict the use of cell phones and other electronic devices in rail operations
  • Ban text messaging and restrict use of cell phones by truck drivers and interstate bus operators
  • Ban school bus drivers convicted of texting while driving from holding commercial driver’s licenses.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data shows that the age group with the greatest proportion of distracted drivers was the under-20 age group.

Parents can encourage driving safety by making cell phone use practical.  Some tips on safe driving and cell phone use:

  • When you know your teen might be driving, don’t just call to visit.
  • Before starting the content of a call, ask the teen if she is driving. If she is, tell her to pull over and call her back.
  • If you need to talk to your teen, make the call short. Don’t have emotional conversations or make critical decisions over the cell phone.

Tools are available for parents to promote safe driving. The Students Against Destructive Decisions group offers a safe driving contract that parents and their children can sign to encourage safe driving.

Parents are encouraged to perform a “commentary drive,” an exercise with their teen drivers to reinforce the dangers of texting while driving. The parent should drive with the teen in the passenger seat and take an unfamiliar route. The teen should start texting and, at the same time, describe two things:

  • what he or she sees
  • how he or she would respond.

Parents should pay attention to the potential hazards the child is missing—a hidden driveway, children playing near the street, etc.—and point them out to the teen.

Parent groups can encourage driving safety by linking parents with these tips and safe driving tools.  These groups can also advocate for “intolerance” for texting while driving and other distracted driving behaviors exhibited by school bus drivers or other employees on school business.

For more information, visit the National PTA’s website

 

Spotlight – Brookshire Elementary Swim Lessons

Students in Kindergarten, First and Second grades at Brookshire recently completed eight weeks of weekly swim lessons.  From August 24 through October 23, each K-2nd classroom swam once per week during one of their PE periods.  The swim lessons are made possible through a grant from the Track Shack Foundation a generous in-kind donations in the form of staffing and facility costs through the YMCA of Central Florida.  Additionally, each class recruits parent volunteers to help the classroom teacher walk the children to and from the pool and supervise on the deck during the lessons.

Led by Brookshire Elementary PE Teachers and Healthy School Team Leader, Coach Randi Topps, swim lessons focus on learning water safety behaviors and basic swimming skills.  Because Coach Topps makes the swim lessons fun, by the end of the eight week unit, most children develop a love for swimming and understand it’s an excellent opportunity to participate in a fun form of exercise.  Many second grade students have advanced swimming skills by the time they complete the second grade swimming unit and a considerable number of Brookshire students even go on to participate in scouts aquatic programs,  competitive swim programs, synchronized swimming, water polo, swim camp,  or triathlon camp.

Way to go Brookshire and Coach Topps!

Swimming 1 Swimming 2 Swimming 3 Swimming 4 Swimming 5

Attend "The 21st Century Family: Learning in a Digital World"

OCPS PTA

The October OCPS Parent Academy event, “The 21st Century Family:  Learning in a Digital World,” is this Saturday, October 10, 2015, from 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM at Freedom High School. The address is 2500 Taft Vineland Road, Orlando 32837. Onsite registration begins at 8:00 AM.  General Session begins at 8:20.

At this event, you will have an opportunity to interact with experts from various OCPS departments (Digital, Curriculum, Multilingual), the Orange County Council of PTA, and more!

All activities and resources are FREE, including breakfast refreshments, lunch and Kona Ice treats.  FREE Interactive childcare is provided for children ages 4-12.  Children will participate in educational music, art, science and physical education activities.  Every child will receive a FREE book!  There will even be a special appearance by Clifford the Big Red Dog!

Register Now!

Should you have any questions or concerns about registering for the event, please contact the OCPS PTA at parentacademy@ocps.net or 407-317-3300.

Attend “The 21st Century Family: Learning in a Digital World”

OCPS PTA

The October OCPS Parent Academy event, “The 21st Century Family:  Learning in a Digital World,” is this Saturday, October 10, 2015, from 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM at Freedom High School. The address is 2500 Taft Vineland Road, Orlando 32837. Onsite registration begins at 8:00 AM.  General Session begins at 8:20.

At this event, you will have an opportunity to interact with experts from various OCPS departments (Digital, Curriculum, Multilingual), the Orange County Council of PTA, and more!

All activities and resources are FREE, including breakfast refreshments, lunch and Kona Ice treats.  FREE Interactive childcare is provided for children ages 4-12.  Children will participate in educational music, art, science and physical education activities.  Every child will receive a FREE book!  There will even be a special appearance by Clifford the Big Red Dog!

Register Now!

Should you have any questions or concerns about registering for the event, please contact the OCPS PTA at parentacademy@ocps.net or 407-317-3300.

Second Annual Florida PTA Healthy Children Healthy Future Summit

PTA summit

REGISTER NOW

Florida PTA is proud to present the Second Annual Healthy Children, Healthy Future State Summit, November 13th and 14th. In keeping with the PTA’s long history of advocating for the physical and emotional well-being of every child, Florida PTA has reached out to the medical community, state agencies, community organizations, and school districts to work collaboratively in this endeavor.

The Healthy Children, Healthy Future State Summit will build on this effort by bringing together PTA leaders, medical professionals, educators, and health & wellness experts from around the state to explore the connection between the physical and emotional wellness of our children and academic achievement. We will learn and share strategies to create, support, and maintain a healthy environment within our schools, communities, and homes.

Topics to include:

Impact of Functional / Educational Health Outcomes

Healthy Sleep, Healthy Learning

LGBTQ Student Resources and Support

Child Trafficking

Child Abuse Prevention Education

Friday, November 13th (6:00 pm – 9:00 pm)

Location: FL PTA State Office, 1747 Orlando Central Parkway, FL 32809

Saturday, November 14th (9:00 am – 5:30 pm)

Location: Embassy Suites  5835 T G Lee Blvd, Orlando, FL 32822