Posts

Self-Discipline Starts at Home

Self-Discipline is getting yourself to follow through on a responsibility (a job or chore) even when you don’t feel like it.  Self-Discipline starts at home where children learn to wait their turn to speak in a conversation, help with the chores before they play or talk with a parent about their frustrating brother or sister rather than hitting and yelling at them.  Encourage your children to show self-discipline in “little things” so they are ready for greater opportunities in the future!  http://characterfirsted.com/

Tips to Help Kids Cope with Food Peer Pressure

food shopping with kidsMuch of life revolves around eating, so you want to be sure that your child is equipped to make healthy choices when you’re not right there. The older a child gets, the more meals and snacks take place outside the home — from school to sleepovers to parties. As kids grow up and gain more independence, outings with friends often include eating in restaurants. Peer pressure, a social reality that affects many areas of life, can easily influence a child’s food preferences and selections in each of these situations.

Eat Right offers these tips to help your child pick healthy options when you’re not around

It Starts At Home – Habits formed at home will follow your child out the door. While studies have shown that peer influences are associated with kids’ eating patterns, it is known that behaviors modeled by family members are a powerful force as well. A review article in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition notes that parents have the opportunity to model positive or negative eating habits, and that this can impact children’s choices in any setting.

 

Healthy Choices at Restaurants – Extravagant portion sizes present a challenge for health-minded kids who are eating out with their friends. Help children and teens practice mindful eating by encouraging them to eat at a slower pace and heed the internal cues that the body sends to let them know they are full. Tell them that cleaning their plate is not always necessary. Help them pick healthy options when you go out as a family.

 

Confidence Under Scrutiny – Friends and even family members may pose awkward questions — such as, “Are you on a diet?” — when kids make different food choices than their peers, or they may tease them for things including drinking water instead of soda at social gatherings. Kids with a strong sense of self-esteem will be more confident in their actions. Encourage them to open up to you regarding their feelings about conversations they’ve had regarding choices that have gone against the norm. Praise them for good decisions. Suggest that they explain that they do eat “sometimes” foods, but that they also want to make healthy choices as often as possible.

 

So Many Options! – School, visits with friends and “special occasions” are ever-present opportunities for kids to practice balanced eating. When there is an array of options, teach them that they can take a “sometimes” food along with a few healthier foods. Get together with other parents of younger children from school and talk about ways you can promote healthy eating in the group as a whole.

 

 

Teenagers Aren’t Getting Enough Exercise at School, or Anywhere

teenagers legsTeenagers can be a notoriously sedentary group. Now a new study showed that school may be a big part of the problem.

The study, which used GPS devices to track when and where teenagers were getting physical activity, found that, on average, they were physically active only 23 minutes a day while at school. Meager as that figure is, it made up over half the 39.4 minutes of physical activity the average teenager got every day.

To continue reading this article, visit The New York Times

Teenagers Aren't Getting Enough Exercise at School, or Anywhere

teenagers legsTeenagers can be a notoriously sedentary group. Now a new study showed that school may be a big part of the problem.

The study, which used GPS devices to track when and where teenagers were getting physical activity, found that, on average, they were physically active only 23 minutes a day while at school. Meager as that figure is, it made up over half the 39.4 minutes of physical activity the average teenager got every day.

To continue reading this article, visit The New York Times