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Girls Are Athletes

Fact: Girls today in the United States are far less likely than boys to be physically active or participate in sports. This means girls are missing out on vital physical, social and emotional health benefits.

But why? One reason: too many girls lack the confidence to get in the game.

We can change that. Join the #GirlsAre movement and help the Alliance for a Healthier Generation empower girls to see themselves as athletes and feel strong, powerful and confident.

Sign the #GirlsAre Pledge

Teen Girls at Highest Risk of Schoolbag-Linked Back Pain

Adolescent girls have the highest risk of suffering from intense back pain related to schoolbag use, according to a study published in the June issue of The Spine Journal.

Irene Aprile, M.D., from the Don Carlo Gnocchi Foundation in Italy, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study involving 5,318 healthy pupils aged 6 to 19 years to examine back pain due to schoolbag use. Participants were interviewed face to face using an ad hoc questionnaire. Pain intensity was assessed using the Wong scale. Participants were classified into two groups: no or mild pain and moderate or severe pain.

The researchers found that more than 60 percent of participants reported pain. Schoolbag-related pain increased significantly from children to young and older adolescents despite a decrease in load. More frequent and more severe pain was reported by girls compared with boys. Adolescent girls were found to be at greatest risk of suffering from intense pain. Schoolbag load weakly impacted back pain, while carrying time was a strong predictor.

“Adolescent girls have the highest risk of experiencing severe back pain, regardless of schoolbag load. This suggests that other factors (anatomical, physiological, or environmental) might play an important role in pain perception,” the authors write. “These aspects should be investigated to plan appropriate preventive and rehabilitative strategies.”

Source:  Physicians Briefing

Study: Girls Start Drinking Before Boys

A new study from Michigan State University is showing that girls are now drinking their first alcoholic drinks before boys, despite the fact that boys were historically the first to start on booze.

The research looked at 390,000 girls across the United States. Study author Dr. Hui Cheng says she’s not sure what it is that caused girls to surpass boys, but it may be due to an increase in splashy, colorful alcohol advertising aimed at women. It’s also relevant that girls reach puberty at a younger age, which tends to result in risky behavior and spending time with older boys.

After 19, boys went on to drink more than girls.

Click here for tips to prevent your teen from experimenting with alochol

National Girls & Women in Sports Day

This year marks the 30th annual National Girls & Women in Sports Day (NGWSD), a national observance celebrating the extraordinary achievements of women and girls in sports.

Join us in recognizing the extraordinary achievements of those who have helped to effect change and create opportunities for women and girls in sports.

Use the hashtag #NGWSD to join the festivities online. Your NGWSD moment could be featured on our site.

For more information, visit http://ngwsd.org

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Teenagers Aren’t Getting Enough Exercise at School, or Anywhere

teenagers legsTeenagers can be a notoriously sedentary group. Now a new study showed that school may be a big part of the problem.

The study, which used GPS devices to track when and where teenagers were getting physical activity, found that, on average, they were physically active only 23 minutes a day while at school. Meager as that figure is, it made up over half the 39.4 minutes of physical activity the average teenager got every day.

To continue reading this article, visit The New York Times

Teenagers Aren't Getting Enough Exercise at School, or Anywhere

teenagers legsTeenagers can be a notoriously sedentary group. Now a new study showed that school may be a big part of the problem.

The study, which used GPS devices to track when and where teenagers were getting physical activity, found that, on average, they were physically active only 23 minutes a day while at school. Meager as that figure is, it made up over half the 39.4 minutes of physical activity the average teenager got every day.

To continue reading this article, visit The New York Times