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Water is Top Kids’ Beverage in U.S.

CDC researchers found that water was the leading drink among US youths ages 2 to 19 between 2013 and 2016, accounting for nearly 44% of total beverage consumption, while milk accounted for 22% of total consumption. The findings in the agency’s NCHS Data Brief also showed higher water intake among Asians and whites, compared with Hispanics and blacks, while boys were less likely to drink water but more likely to drink milk than girls.  Read more.

Go on a Grocery Field Trip

Use grocery shopping to teach kids about food and nutrition. Talk about where vegetables, fruits, protein foods, dairy, and grains come from. Help them make healthy choices.

Fifth Annual Milk Run 5K

UF/IFAS Extension Orange County will host its fifth annual Milk Run 5K as part of the Healthy Living Expo on Saturday March 24, 2018. The race will begin at 9:00am at the UF/IFAS Extension Orange County.

The run will be held on the former T.G. Lee Dairy property and presents one of the few off-road running opportunities in the Orlando metropolitan area. Throughout the run, participants can enjoy a journey through a working cattle operation ranch with lots of wildlife in the city limits.

All proceeds will benefit Extension programs. Registration is $25 through March 16th. Groups of five or more will receive a discount. Late registrations after March 17th and the day of the run will be available. Prizes will be awarded by age division and refreshments will be provided by the sponsors to all participants.

This is an event that supports healthy living with something for everybody and is perfect for a family activity. For more information and registration, go to: http://milkrun.org or call 407-254-9222 for paper registration.

Tips to Get Calcium Beyond Milk

Food Festival 3x

Mom always told you to drink your milk, but did you listen? Although it’s one of the easiest ways to get your daily dose of calcium, not everyone can stomach dairy. Still, we all need calcium for strong, healthy bones, teeth and muscles. If milk isn’t your child’s thing, but you don’t want them to come up short, consider these additional sources of calcium:

Canned seafood

One 3-ounce can of pink, canned salmon solids with bone gives your child 181 mg of calcium. Sardines are another great source of calcium; one can delivers 351 mg. Try mixing them into a salad if your child is worried worried about the taste.

Fortified drinks

Consider calcium-fortified soy milk, almond milk, rice milk or orange or cranberry juice. Check for labels on canned frozen juices to ensure they’re “calcium-fortified.” Just 6 ounces of calcium-fortified orange juice provides 261 mg of calcium, according to the National Institutes of Health. One 8-ounce glass of fortified soy milk yields 299 mg of calcium. (Budget-conscious shoppers: Pass on the organic or freshly squeezed juices, which don’t always provide extra calcium.)

Beans

Black-eyed peas pack a particularly hefty dose of calcium; just 1 cup weighs in at 183 mg. Baked beans are also high in calcium.  Soak beans in water for several hours and cook them in fresh water to reduce a naturally occurring substance known as phytate, which can interfere with the body’s absorption of calcium, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Vegetables

Collard greens, turnip greens, kale, okra, Chinese cabbage, dandelion greens, spinach, mustard greens and broccoli are all excellent sources of calcium. For example, a half cup of fresh, boiled turnip greens delivers 99 mg of calcium, and 1 cup of raw, chopped kale packs 100 mg.

Nuts and seeds

A single cup of plain almonds delivers 243 mg of calcium, 1 cup of walnuts provides 78 mg. Hazelnuts are even better, with 1 cup packing 154 mg of calcium. Brazil nuts, found in most grocery stores, provide 213 mg per cup. Add flaxseeds or sunflower seeds to a green leafy salad for even more calcium. If your child is a peanut butter person, consider alternatives such as almond butter, cashew butter or pumpkin seed butter for a boost in calcium with less sodium.

Oatmeal and cereal

Breakfast cereals and hot instant oatmeal offer an easy way to stuff calcium into your child’s diet. Just be sure to grab a low-sugar brand or the old-fashioned rolled oats, which typically have less sugar than some instant packets. One cup of ready-to-eat cereal, meanwhile, can provide anywhere from 100 to 1,000 mg of calcium depending on the brand.

New: 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Dietary-GuidelinesThe 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans were released last week.  The guidelines, which are revised every five years, are based on evolving nutrition science and serve as the government’s official advice on what to eat. One concrete change: Americans are being told to limit sugar to no more than 10 percent of daily calories.

Here’s a comparison of the added sugars that the average American eats with how much they should be eating, according to the most recent guidelines:

sugars-chartKey Recommendations

Consume a healthy eating pattern that accounts for all foods and beverages within an appropriate calorie level.

A healthy eating pattern includes:

  • A variety of vegetables from all of the subgroups—dark green, red and orange, legumes (beans and peas), starchy, and other
  • Fruits, especially whole fruits
  • Grains, at least half of which are whole grains
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy, including milk, yogurt, cheese, and/or fortified soy beverages
  • A variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, legumes (beans and peas), and nuts, seeds, and soy products
  • Oils

A healthy eating pattern limits:

  • Saturated fats and trans fats, added sugars, and sodium

Additional recommendations include:

  • Consume less than 10 percent of calories per day from added sugars
  • Consume less than 10 percent of calories per day from saturated fats
  • Consume less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) per day of sodium
  • Meet the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans
 Click here for additional information on the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Gridiron 3 Cooking Challenge

Gridiron 2016_Flyer_rev11.11.15

Gridiron 2016 Flyer

The Gridiron Cooking Challenge is Back!  This is an excellent opportunity to highlight your student’s cooking skills and be eligible to win a $2500 school prize pack and four tablets!!!

Gather a team of four students (elementary and middle school) and one adult and create a unique recipe that showcases dairy products (milk, cheese and/or yogurt).  All recipes must be prepared and cooked in 60 minutes.

Send the recipe, including a description and a picture of the finished recipe to the Fuel Up to Play 60 Team at the Dairy Council of Florida.  See flyer for contact information.  Recipes are due by midnight on Feb. 29, 2016.

Finalists will be notified by March 18, 2016.

After School Snack – Apple and Cheese Quesadilla

This apple and cheese quesadilla is an ideal after school snack.  It’s loaded with fruit, dairy, and whole grains to fuel you child’s brain plus it’s easy and quick to make.  A win for everyone!

[gmc_recipe 5729]